TOMORROW [JUNE 29 2024AD] – ‘WALKING THE WEST OF IFIELD RURAL FRINGE’ – 11AM FROM THE PLOUGH IN IFIELD VILLAGE [RETURN AROUND 1PM]

 

West of Ifield Rural Fringe [running north-south – centre of map – in brown]

JUNE 24 2024 – WEST OF IFIELD RURAL FRINGE: “ANY SUCH DEVELOPMENT SHOULD PROTECT THE SETTING OF CRAWLEY’S EXISTING NEIGHBOURHOODS AT THE EDGE OF THE COUNTRYSIDE” – CRAWLEY [EMERGING] LOCAL PLAN MODIFICATIONS – FEBRUARY 2024 – PARAGRAPHS 12.17 TO 12.23 – The Ifield Society

JUNE 28 2024 – WEST OF IFIELD RURAL FRINGE: “THERE IS NO PROTECTION. THE DEVELOPMENT IS SIMPLY BOLTED-ON TO THE EXISTING CRAWLEY NEIGHBOURHOODS – ESPECIALLY IFIELD, IFIELD WEST AND BEWBUSH” – RICHARD W. SYMONDS [THE IFIELD SOCIETY] – The Ifield Society

JUNE 28 2024 – WEST OF IFIELD RURAL FRINGE: “TWO MASSIVE DEVELOPMENTS HAVE ALREADY BEEN BOLTED-ON TO CRAWLEY’S EXISTING NEIGHBOURHOODS WEST OF IFIELD: KILNWOOD VALE AND THE MAPLES. WE HAVE GOOD REASON TO BE DEEPLY CONCERNED ABOUT POWERFUL BULLIES STEAMROLLING OVER THE DEMOCRATIC PLANNING PROCESS IN THIS AREA” – RICHARD W. SYMONDS [THE IFIELD SOCIETY] – The Ifield Society

JUNE 21 2024 – IFIELD BROOK MEADOWS [WEST OF IFIELD]: “ANY SUCH DEVELOPMENT SHOULD PROTECT THE SETTING OF CRAWLEY’S EXISTING NEIGHBOURHOODS AT THE EDGE OF THE COUNTRYSIDE” – CRAWLEY [EMERGING] LOCAL PLAN MODIFICATIONS – FEBRUARY 2024 – PARAGRAPHS 12.17 TO 12.23

FEBRUARY 6 2024 – “PROPOSALS WHICH RESPECT THIS AREA OF LOCALLY SPECIAL RURAL FRINGE, THE NATURE CONSERVATION AND RECREATION VALUE, ITS POSITIVE RELATIONSHIP WITH THE URBAN EDGE, AND LINKS TO THE WIDER COUNTRYSIDE WILL BE ENCOURAGED” – CRAWLEY LOCAL PLAN – PROPOSED MODIFICATION TO CL8: DEVELOPMENT OUTSIDE THE BUILT-UP AREA – WEST OF IFIELD RURAL FRINGE [PAGE 60]

THE MAPLES SITE – IAN MULCAHY

Map 1

01_01 The Maples Site (14857) (HER record)

Of course, we have already seen a small amount of development west of Ifield in the form of the small test site known as ‘The Maples’ (a development diary), opposite the entrance to Ifield Golf Club and it is here that the first, and possibly most significant to date, asset was found.
Lots of ditches were found here during archaeological excavations and many of these were dated to around the 19th century and were deemed to be field boundary ditches.
These are pretty common and of no interest, but in another, much older ditch a substantial amount of Romano-British pottery was recovered and this was dated to the 1st-4th century.
Another ditch turned up iron slag, which remains undated. We know, for certain, that there was a substantial Iron Age and Romano-British iron working site one and a half miles to the south-east at Broadfield/Southgate West (see The Iron Industry In Crawley for full details).
Was this a, probably smaller, iron working site contemporary with its near neighbour or was this slag perhaps linked to the one of the medieval iron working sites nearby, either the one a short distance north of the church (see below) or that which existed on the banks of the Brook where Ifield Mill Pond now is?
Further finds tell us that the site has been one of human activity for far longer; A prehistoric flint blade and waste flint flakes were also found in a further ditch and, while they remain undated, the suggestion is that they are from the Bronze Age (3100 – 300 BC).
We know, again with certainty, that humans were active in the area during the Bronze Age due to the barrow (a burial mound) in woods close to Cottesmore School besides the ancient ridgeway joining East Grinstead with Horsham and thanks to the 1952 discovery of a sword, dated to between 1000 and 700 BC, 2 miles to the north-east close to the River Mole a little east of Poles Lane.
Are the flints contemporary with the sword, or possibly older? This site could have been one used by humans for 5,000 years and has been described as a probable large settlement site spanning the period between the Bronze Age and Roman period.

Some photos of The Maples site prior to its development

 

A MIDDLE IRON AGE ROUNDHOUSE AT RUSPER ROAD, NEAR IFIELD – SUSSEX ARCHAEOLOGICAL COLLECTIONS – 159 [2021], 65-72

Photo provided by Ian Mulcahy

 

Book Cover
Introduction
Page 65

 

Page 66

 

Page 67

 

Page 68

 

Page 69

 

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